TIPS AND TRICKS

 

DIFFERENT LENS, DIFFERENT LOOK

Something you will learn pretty quickly is that every lens handles the sun differently. Longer focal lengths will handle it differently than wider ones and even two different lenses of the same focal length will give you two different results. This is because the sun flare is a result of the sun shining into the lens and bouncing around the glass inside. Since the glass is different from lens to lens (both in shape,and quality), you will always end up with a unique result. Longer lenses will give you larger washed out artifacts while wider lenses will give you smaller and more dynamic flare. The distance the subject is from your lens and the aperture that the image was shot at will also effect the final image. The reason I am telling you this is so you experiment. Shoot with all of your lenses and change up your settings to see what you prefer. I could go into a lengthy explanation of the differences I’ve found but the best way to learn them is to shoot them for yourself. Don’t be afraid to experiment a bit!

EXPOSING BACK LIT IMAGES

One of the more common mistakes that photographers make when starting to shoot into the sun is that they will expose for the sky instead of exposing for their subject. This leaves the subject drastically underexposed and much less of a focal point. The reason that this is such an easy mistake to make is because most of us were taught not to overexpose because you will lose detail in that area of the image. While that is true, The detail that I want to preserve is in my subject, not the sky. I overexpose the sky almost every time that I shoot back lit because the sky isn’t my main concern (sorry, sky). What I typically aim for is the limit right before I overexpose my subject. Make sure you read that correctly, I aim for the limit right BEFORE I overexpose. Even if you are shooting RAW, if you accidentally overexpose, you will not be able to get back blown out details in post because the image data is simply not there. A good way to find that limit is to turn on the highlight alert on your camera. Every camera has a different way to turn it on which can be found online (thank you Google) or in your camera’s manual without much trouble. The highlight alert will tell you where you have lost the details due to overexposure in your image. Every pixel on your image that has lost detail will flash on your LCD screen. If you see flashing pixels on your subject, dial down the exposure to the point right before it starts to flash. This way if you choose to push it father in post, you still can but the details will remain in your image either way.

  5D II + 35L Your camera will lie to you. Don't worry, it's not trying to be sneaky. It just doesn't know any better. When the sun is coming right into your lens, your camera's meter will tell you to lower the exposure a ton so the sky is what is exposed correctly. In my images, the people are what matter so I ignore the camera and expose for their skin instead.

 

5D II + 35L

Your camera will lie to you. Don't worry, it's not trying to be sneaky. It just doesn't know any better. When the sun is coming right into your lens, your camera's meter will tell you to lower the exposure a ton so the sky is what is exposed correctly. In my images, the people are what matter so I ignore the camera and expose for their skin instead.

  5D III + 35L With the sun just peaking over the cliff in the background, the camera meter was telling me to expose this so dark that I wouldn't have been able to bring back proper skin tones in post. Instead of listening to the camera and exposing for the sky, I metered for the skin and exposed correctly for what matters to me, Preston and Alexi. Go home camera, you're drunk.

 

5D III + 35L
With the sun just peaking over the cliff in the background, the camera meter was telling me to expose this so dark that I wouldn't have been able to bring back proper skin tones in post. Instead of listening to the camera and exposing for the sky, I metered for the skin and exposed correctly for what matters to me, Preston and Alexi. Go home camera, you're drunk.

FOCUSING

Another difficulty you may come across when shooting into the sun is acquiring focus. With the sun beating through your lens and into the sensor the camera will have a hard time finding the point of focus. An easy way to battle this is to focus and recompose. I almost always have my center focus point selected and focus on my subject and then recompose the shot to how I want it before firing the shutter. To battle your misfocusing camera, you just need to hide sun, focus, bring the sun back, and fire. It is a pretty simple process that will save you a lot of frustration from waiting for you camera to focus. Hide the sun, focus and then recompose. Bam! Problem solved.

  5D III + 50L Bo and Becca are pretty freaking incredible. We shot their engagement session in Florida where the sun shines so strong, you'll think you're melting (and you might be). I chose to use this frame as an example because the flare in the bottom left corner is the exact reason that cameras can have trouble shooting back lit. Those little artifacts are caused by the light shining into your lens and bouncing around on the internal glass. That same light shines on your sensor and makes it go haywire which is why you may find your lens hunting back and forth for focus. In this frame I hid it right behind her head while I focused before bringing it back in for the shot.

 

5D III + 50L

Bo and Becca are pretty freaking incredible. We shot their engagement session in Florida where the sun shines so strong, you'll think you're melting (and you might be). I chose to use this frame as an example because the flare in the bottom left corner is the exact reason that cameras can have trouble shooting back lit. Those little artifacts are caused by the light shining into your lens and bouncing around on the internal glass. That same light shines on your sensor and makes it go haywire which is why you may find your lens hunting back and forth for focus. In this frame I hid it right behind her head while I focused before bringing it back in for the shot.

  5D II + 35L This shoot started way too early in the morning and towards the end of it we had the fiery light of the sun bouncing off of the water behind her and heading straight onto my sensor. While I loved the look, I wasn't a huge fan what it was doing to my autofocus. To help my camera out, I'd aimed it down a bit so the water (and the light it was reflecting) wasn't in the frame,  focused, recomposed, and shot. Bingo!

 

5D II + 35L

This shoot started way too early in the morning and towards the end of it we had the fiery light of the sun bouncing off of the water behind her and heading straight onto my sensor. While I loved the look, I wasn't a huge fan what it was doing to my autofocus. To help my camera out, I'd aimed it down a bit so the water (and the light it was reflecting) wasn't in the frame,  focused, recomposed, and shot. Bingo!